Scented Sight Words

I love center activities that I can teach once and easily change the content to use all year.  It’s a life saver in the primary classroom!

Recently I had the opportunity to connect with some amazing teachers at the French Lick Teacher/Blogger Retreat and one of the awesome things I brought home were Scentos markers!  The colors are bright, the markers themselves are adorable with little faces on them and they smell amazing!  Plus they come in a variety of sizes that are perfect for making lists, writing anchor charts or just plain coloring!

My own kiddos were immediately in love with them.

Apparently the markers are perfect for coloring fast!

And Miss O invented her own game “You have to have 25 patterns to win.”  Can you tell she’s a teacher’s kid?

And my students in the reading room love the Color Scents for writing.

Since the Scentos markers were such a hit, I knew I had to come up with a use for these markers in the classroom!

It’s the perfect reason to buy more markers, pens and colored pencils for the classroom (you know you want to! ;)) and makes it engaging to practice sight words with the simple spinner or dice!

I used the scents from the Scentos colored pencils and the Scentos 8 pack of Fruit Scented Markers.  

The concept is simple: roll the dice or spin the spinner to pick a scent.  Then use that marker to write your sight word.  I always have my students read their words to a partner, too.

This pack has lots of different options for recording sheets: 10 or 5 words, write the words once per page or twice…

…use a word list or print the words directly on the editable pages.

The scented markers are sure to make this an engaging center!  Want to try it in your classroom?  Click here to see the free sample in my Teachers Pay Teachers store.

Check out the full Scented Sight Words product which includes over 20 different recording sheets, tons of editable options and all 220 Dolch words on printable lists.

Want to win the full version?  Head over to my Instagram account for details!

 

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Free Classroom Testing Signs

My third graders start state testing tomorrow…but at least my door will have a cute sign to remind students who visit the library to (attempt to) whisper while we test!  You can grab these signs free by clicking here.

Here’s hoping they remember what we taught them and just do their very best!

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Jelly Bean Science and Science Snack

It’s possible I have an obsession with candy science.  It’s just so much fun and it’s automatically engaging because…well, it’s candy!

Today we’re using jelly beans!

First are two experiments that you can get started at the same time: Sink or Float? and Disappearing Jelly Beans.

For these experiments you will need:

  • 4 cups
  • 5 jelly beans – one for each cup, plus a control
  • Vinegar
  • Banking soda
  • Salt

  1.  Start by labeling each cup (water, baking soda, vinegar, salt) and filling them half way with water.
  2. Add one tablespoon of salt to the first cup.  Stir to dissolve.
  3. Add one tablespoon of vinegar to the second cup.  Stir.
  4. Add one tablespoon of baking soda to the next cup.  Stir to dissolve.
  5. Make a hypothesis about weather you think the jelly beans will sink or float.

6.  Place a jelly bean in each cup and document your results.

7. Make a hypothesis abut what will happen to the jelly beans in each solution.

These results started almost immediately for me with both Nerds jelly beans and Sweet Tart jelly beans.  You can actually see the sugar coating starting to dissolve within seconds!

9.  Let your jelly beans soak for about 20 minutes.

10.  Document and summarize your results.

These results are fun to compare with marshmallow peeps in the same solutions, too, because the results are slightly different.  You can see the Peeps results here.

Extend the jelly bean fun with a science snack using chocolate and jelly beans to make Bunny Bait!

For this science snack you will need:

  • melting chocolate (any color)
  • jelly beans
  • parchment paper
  • a cookie sheet

  1. Start by making observations and a hypothesis about what will happen when you heat the chocolate.

2. Heat the chocolate in a slow cooker or microwave.  This time I bought the ready to microwave package of chocolates and it was so easy!

3. Document your results.

4. Cover a cookie sheet with parchment paper.

5. Pour the melted chocolate onto the parchment paper.

6. Sprinkle with jelly beans.

7. Allow to harden, then break into pieces.

You can find the lab books for these activities in my Teachers Pay Teachers store by clicking here.

What kind of science is your class doing this spring?

Posted in Classroom, first grade, kindergarten, my products, science, states of matter | Tagged , , , , , | 1 Comment

Peeps Science Snacks

I’m back today sharing two fun science snacks using marshmallow Peeps!

Both of these activities focus on states of matter and how matter can change from solid to liquid and back again.  Plus, they’re really easy!

First up is Spring Pudding!

You will need:

  • chocolate pudding mix (one box per four students)
  • milk (two cups per box of pudding)
  • chocolate cookies (I used graham crackers)
  • whipped cream
  • green food coloring
  • marshmallow peeps (I think the rabbits turned out the cutest!)
  • cups
  • spoons
  • mixing bowls
  • mixing spoons
  • measuring cups

First, decide what state of matter the milk is before you start and make your hypothesis about what will happen when it is mixed with pudding mix and chilled.  Then, just follow the directions on your pudding:

  1. Pour the pudding mix into the mixing bowl.

2. Add two cups of milk and stir to dissolve.

3.  Pour the pudding mix into cups.  Refrigerate according to the package directions.

4.  While the pudding chills, add green food coloring to the whipped cream and mix.

5.  Crush your cookies to make the dirt.  I gave each student half a graham cracker and it was plenty.

While you’re waiting, it’s also the perfect time to do some quick science experiments with your peeps like heating peeps!  Find out more about those by clicking here.

6. Once you remove the pudding from the refrigerator, pour the cookie dirt onto the pudding.

7.  Add whipped cream grass.

8. Pop in your Peep and sprinkle some jelly beans (optional, but I thought they looked extra cute).

9.  Document your results and enjoy your treat!

You can find this full lab booklet – along with three Peeps science experiments – in my Teachers Pay Teachers store by clicking here.

OR if pudding just isn’t your thing, try Peep Pops!

For this science snack you will need:

  • Rabbit peeps
  • melting chocolate
  • small sticks – Popsicle sticks or lollipop sticks will both work
  • mini marshmallows
  • parchment paper

  1. Start by making observations and writing your hypothesis.
  2. Then, melt your chocolate.  You can do this in a slow cooker on low or microwave.  I got the ready to microwave pack from the grocery store and it was quick and easy!
  3. Document the results after you heat the chocolate.

4.  Place your peep onto a stick.

5. Dip the peep into the melted chocolate.

 

6.  Place the chocolate covered Peep on parchment paper and add a mini marshmallow tail.

7.  Allow your Peep Pop time to set and then enjoy!

You can find this science snack lab booklet – along with three fun Peeps Experiments – in my Teachers Pay Teachers store by clicking here.

Enjoy!

Posted in Classroom, first grade, kindergarten, my products, science, states of matter | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Science with My Peeps

Spring is coming (right?!?) and I’m getting ready for my favorite kind of seasonal class room fun – candy science activities!

Weather you love them or hate them (ME!) in your Easter basket, peeps make great for some great science!

Today I’m sharing a couple fun experiments – that gave me surprising results – and two science snacks all featuring the sugar covered sugar AKA peeps!

I love simple science questions for the primary classroom and one of my favorites is to see what happens when candy is soaked in different liquids.  We’ve tried gummy bears, candy canes, candy corn, candy hearts and licorice and seen two types of results: the candy dissolves or it gets bigger. Students always expect the candy to dissolve so they are shocked by the other results.

For this experiment you need:

  • 4 cups
  • 5 peeps – one for each cup, plus a control
  • Vinegar
  • Banking soda
  • Salt

  1.  Start labeling each cup (water, baking soda, vinegar, salt) and filling them half way with water.
  2. Add one tablespoon of salt to the first cup.  Stir to dissolve.
  3. Add one tablespoon of vinegar to the second cup.  Stir.
  4. Add one tablesppon of baking soda to the next cup.  Stir to dissolve.
  5. Make a hypothesis about weather you think the peeps will sink or float.
  6. Place a peep into each cup.
  7. Document your sink or float results.
  8. 8.   Make a hypotesis about what will happen to the peeps in the different solutions.
  9. Allow the peeps to soak for 30 minutes (or more, my results were the same from about 30 minutes through 24 hours of soaking).
  10.  After soaking, remove each peep from the water and observe the results as compared with an unsoaked peep.

All the peeps grew larger and most of the water turned pink, except the vinegar water, which stayed totally clear.

We also tried heating the peeps.  This is a super fast, but awesome and messy experiment!

 

Start by packing the peeps into a cup.

Make your hypothesis.

Then, place the cup in the microwave and heat for 30 seconds.

Don’t blink because the results happen FAST!

You can find this lab booklet (that also includes two science snack lab booklets) in my Teachers Pay Teachers store by clicking here.

Do you have a favorite science activity to do with your class?

 

 

 

Posted in Classroom, first grade, my products, science | Tagged , , , , , , | 3 Comments